Metanav

Tag Archives | IOT medical devices

Powering Predictive Maintenance

Powering Predictive Maintenance from IEEE Innovation at WorkPredictive maintenance is one of the most compelling use cases for the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). In fact, according to IBM, predictive maintenance can prevent up to 70% of equipment breakdowns, and reduce downtime by as much as 50%.

In the IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio (IEEE, 2017), this use case is highlighted as one of the biggest market opportunities in the next five years, impacting industries such as shipping and logistics, process industries, discrete manufacturing, utilities, and healthcare. Even governments are taking advantage of predictive maintenance: The United States Department of Defense just announced that it will use C3 IoT’s platform to develop artificial intelligence tools for predictive maintenance of assets. (Dignan, 2017)

As organizations begin to take advantage of predictive maintenance, the practical matter of deployment comes into play. Not every device and sensor used for predictive maintenance can be wired. Wireless applications are numerous, and powering those deployments in a sustainable way is critical.

That’s where IEEE Wake-Up Radio comes into play. This upcoming standard, being developed by the IEEE 802.11ba standards task group, will significantly increase battery life in Internet of Things devices. The energy savings is significant, increasing the life of a single battery by years. This reduces costs even further for organizations that seek the benefits of predictive maintenance, both in terms of the cost of the batteries themselves, as well as in the man-hours needed to physically change the batteries. Depending on the number of devices and sensors deployed within an organization, the cost savings can be significant.

The development of predictive maintenance devices and sensors needs to take IEEE Wake-Up Radio into account when planning future devices. If the devices will be connected via 802.11 (Wi-Fi®), then IEEE Wake-Up Radio is required in order to stay competitive in a crowded market.

To learn more about IEEE Wake-Up Radio, check out the IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio, available now.

 

Resources

IEEE. (November 2017) IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio: An Application, Market, and Technology Impact Analysis of Low-Power/Low-Latency 802.11 Wireless LAN Interfaces. IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Standards Association.

Dignan, L. (November 2017). C3 IoT Lands Department of Defense Deal for Aircraft Predictive Maintenance. ZDNet. 

 

Continue Reading 0

How to Make IoT Batteries Last Longer

Make IoT Batteries Last Longer: IEEE Wake-Up Radio InfographicAnalyst firm Gartner predicts that there will be 8.4 billion connected “things” in 2017, which will then expand to 20.4 billion Internet of Things (IOT) devices by 2020. That number is staggering. And it is reasonable to expect that a great many of these devices will run on batteries. Yet battery life can be limited. How do we make IoT batteries last longer?

Consider the use cases:

  • Wearable medical devices that cannot be hard wired
  • Logistics sensors on vehicles, moving from place to place
  • Agricultural IoT devices in the middle of fields
  • Smart home consumer devices that are easier to install without hardwiring, increasing market adoption

…and these are just a few instances of the many IoT use cases that will require battery operated devices. Given the sheer number of devices, it is essential that IoT manufacturers create devices that have a long battery life while maintaining optimal performance. We must make IoT batteries last longer.

This is why the IEEE 802.11ba standards working group is developing the IEEE Wake-Up Radio standard. This technology has the potential to increase battery life in IoT devices from months to years. When you consider the cost of replacing 20.4 billion batteries (both the batteries themselves, as well as the time involved), this will have significant economic impact.

How it Works

IoT devices have an embedded radio that has to “wake up” in order for data to be transmitted. The longer the device is awake, the more power it consumes, but the higher the performance. To solve the power issue, a 2nd, low-power, duty-cycled Wake-Up Radio is added to the device that waits for transmissions. This Wake-Up Radio only wakes up the main device when it is needs to, allowing a longer device sleep state without compromising performance. Ensuring that the Wake-Up Radio uses duty cycling increases the battery life even more.

The result is a high-performance IoT device that last for years rather than months on a single battery.

The impact is clear. IoT devices that will run on IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi®) connections need IEEE Wake-Up Radio. Device manufacturers need this information now, in order to build this into their IoT devices of tomorrow.

IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio

To help IoT device manufacturers prepare for IEEE Wake-Up Radio even before the standard is released, IEEE is offering a technology report that outlines the technology, use cases, and more. The report will be released on 2 November, 2017, and is available for pre-sale now. Device manufacturers that begin planning for IEEE Wake-Up Radio now will have a competitive advantage, especially in consumer categories where IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi®) connections are ubiquitous. They will be able to make IoT batteries last longer in their devices.

Increasing battery life in IoT devices is essential. When it comes to devices that run on IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi®) connections, IEEE Wake-Up Radio is the solution. Pre-order the IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio now, and prepare your organization for a competitive advantage in the future.

 

References

Tung, L. (2017, Feb 7). IoT Devices Will Outnumber the World’s Population this Year for the First Time. ZDNet.

McCormick, D. (2017, Nov 2). 802.11ba Battery Life Improvement – Preview: IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio. IEEE Xplore.

 

 

Continue Reading 0

IoT and Data Privacy

IoT Data PrivacyThe Internet of Things (IoT) can produce massive amounts of data. This data has to be transmitted, processed in some way, and then potentially stored somewhere, hopefully securely. (Pollmann, 2017) Much of this data is personal data, and some can be quite sensitive. This brings data privacy questions to the forefront. How secure is the data that is generated by IoT devices? How is it used? What happens to that data once the process is complete? IoT data privacy is key.

When considering data privacy regulations around the world, particularly those required by the EU’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) that go into effect in May of 2018, the amount of data generated by the growing IoT is a pressing concern. Both developers and consumers of IoT devices will be held responsible for their use of personal data.

Questions to Consider for IoT Data Privacy

Some of the questions that IoT developers and consumers need to consider:

  • What personal data does my IoT device collect about others?
  • Where is that data sent?
  • How is the data used?
  • Is all of the data collected used, or is there information the device should not collect?
  • Does anyone else have access to the data?
  • Where is the data ultimately stored?
  • How long is the data kept?
  • Do we need to build in an expiration time frame for data storage?
  • How secure is that data during transfer and storage?
  • How will consumers be notified if there is a data breach?

The fines for non-compliance with personal data regulations can be millions of dollars/euros, so it is essential that IoT device manufacturers, as well as those that use them, take the time to understand these regulations, and then consult with attorneys on an approach to personal data use, transfer, and storage. IoT data privacy needs to be built into these devices from the ground up, so that personal information remains secure.

Is your organization developing IoT devices? How do you take IoT data privacy into account? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments.

And to learn more about the Internet of Things, check out IEEE Guide to the Internet of Things. This course program will provides the foundation that you need to understand the Internet of Things and some of its industry applications.

 

References

Pollmann, M. (2017, September 25) IoT data is growing fast, and security remains the biggest hurdle. IoT Agenda.

EU General Data Protection Regulation Portal.

Continue Reading 3

Millennials, Ownership, and the Internet of Things

Millennials, Ownership, and IOT PrivacyMillennials are concerned, and rightly so, about connected devices and security. Nearly 75% of Millennials surveyed by KPMG indicated they would be likely to “use more IoT devices if they had more confidence that the devices were secure.” (Strother 2017) As developers of IoT devices consider the market viability of their devices, this creates a two-fold challenge. Not only must they develop more secure devices. Developers also need to convince Millennials that these devices are more secure, and worth adopting.

As digital natives, Millennials potentially have greater exposure and access to devices. As a result, this is one area Millennials can offer some insight and guidance to older generations. While Millennial use of IoT products is lower than other generations, one considerable factor is because they are not yet homeowners. (Strother 2017) Many of the developments in IoT devices are in smart home technology, which Millennials may just not need yet. Yet there are also other concerns, most notably IoT privacy.

The Millennial reaction to privacy concerns and adoption of IoT devices can lead the way in how other generations should view these devices. Perhaps because they are digital natives, they have a different understanding of ownership, and having control over your things continues to evolve in our digital world.

Those in Gen X and Baby Boomers were raised during times where the definition of ownership was simple. You bought something and it was yours. Today, however, we are more likely to rent access than own anything. And often times that access comes at the cost of the information collected by our devices. Today an individual’s private information is currency, one we often give up in exchange for the convenience of digital devices. Since IoT devices generate and pass a great deal of personal information, the cost of these devices can be high, paid in the currency of privacy. IoT privacy is a pressing concern.

So, how can one build and develop IoT devices that consider the new ideas of ownership and take into account growing privacy concerns?  There must be a fundamental understanding of how standardization will play a role in IoT privacy and ownership, as well as plans to evolve as quickly as technologies and questions arise.

Could your organization benefit from a more comprehensive understanding of the Internet of Things? IEEE offers courses to help businesses prepare through the online course program IEEE Guide to the Internet of Things.

 

References

Strother, N. (2017, March 24) IoT and Millennials. Forbes.

Michels, D. (2017, September 12) Today’s Property Rules Don’t Work in our IoT World. Network World.

 

Continue Reading 0

Medical Device Cyber Security is Essential

medical device cyber security

No one wants to imagine that their pacemaker or insulin pump can be hacked when their life depends on the proper functioning of these medical devices. However, a recent Ponemon Institute survey discovered that 67 percent of medical device manufacturers and 56% percent of Healthcare Delivery Organizations (HDOs) think an attack on a medical device in use is likely to occur over the next 12 months (2017 Trip Wire). That information provides an added layer of anxiety for patients, medical providers, and manufacturers, and makes medical device cyber security more important than ever.

There is good news, though. In the last 5 years, healthcare providers and manufacturers have made an effort to include cyber attacks in their contingency plans, and put into place resources to mitigate a potential breach. (2017 TripWire)

These well designed security plans for medical device cyber security include:

  • Dedicated budget for cyber security
  • Cyber security professionals included in the staffing headcount
  • Risk assessments regularly performed by healthcare providers
  • Regularly conduct penetration testing
  • Security awareness and training programs made available
  • And much more…

The US Food and Drug Administration has been making inroads to mitigate any potential attacks with updates to security measures and by seeking to formalize guidelines. As with all guidelines, they do not have to be followed. However, if a provider adopts the recommendations, medical device cyber security can be improved, making the industry and the patient less apprehensive. (2017 TripWire) Not to mention the fact that the provider can use these security measures as a competitive advantage.

Want to learn more about cyber security and how it can affect the healthcare industry? IEEE offers both cyber security and ethical hacking training to help corporations prepare. Learn more about institutional pricing and request a quote here.

References

Newman, L. (2017, March 2) Medical Devices Are the Next Security Nightmare. Wired

(2017, August 27) Highs & Lows of Cyber Security in Healthcare. TripWire

Continue Reading 0

IoT and Insurance: How IoT Data Will Transform an Industry

IoT and Insurance: How IoT Data Will Transform an IndustryThe insurance industry has always tried to assess risk: how likely is it that something bad will happen? This assessment is based on a number of demographic and other factors that help insurers decide how much risk is involved, and how much premiums will cost. With the evolution of the Internet of Things (IoT), however, insurers have the opportunity to assess risk at a more granular level, opening the way to a new class of products and services that take the data produced by IoT devices into account. The Internet of Things and insurance work together to provide a better customer experience.

For example, Vik Renjen, SVP Sutherland Global Services, predicts that auto insurers will offer “usage-based insurance.” This takes into account “history of speed, distance, turning and braking patterns, time of day and much more from the vehicles of prospective policy owners.” (Reiss, 2016) When insurers take a look at the actual driving patterns of the people they insure, then the best drivers will receive the best prices on their insurance.

IoT devices can also help alert  property owners to events such as fires or water leaks, which can prevent more damage and larger insurance payouts. (Makhluf, 2017) These environmental monitoring systems are inexpensive to install, and alerts can be received through a smartphone. In addition to alerting property owners, IoT systems can also be created to mitigate the problem. For example, a water leak might cause the water valve to be turned off. By using these systems, greater damage and expense can be avoided, which makes these systems a great benefit to insurance companies and property owners alike.

Finally, wearable devices can be used to encourage healthy behaviors and reduce health insurance costs. Insurance company John Hancock, for example, distributed free Fitbits to its customers. This encouraged healthy behaviors, which meant that customers were less likely to file a costly insurance claim. (Drinkwater, 2016) Additionally, wearable health devices help patients and their physicians identify health issues early when they can be treated for less expense, rather than waiting for more serious conditions to develop.

The Internet of Things and insurance is a game-changer, and will only continue to help insurance companies gain insight into the behaviors and risks presented by their customers. This will result in premiums that are better matched to customers, and lower risk for the industry.

Want to learn more about the Internet of Things? Check out the newest course program from IEEE: IEEE Guide to the Internet of Things. Special discount pricing for organizations!

References:

Drinkwater, D. (2016, May 24). 10 Real-Life Examples of IoT in Insurance. Internet of Business.

Makhluf, J. (2017, Sep 5). How IoT is inviting insurers into smart homes. Property Casualty 360.

Reiss, R. (2016, Feb 1). 5 Ways the IoT Will Transform the Insurance Industry. Forbes.

 

Continue Reading 0

New Report: IoT will Help Healthcare Organizations Realize Significant Cost Savings

IEEE Guide to the Internet of Things for HealthcareA recent report from consulting firm Accenture found that the Internet of Things has the potential to offer both healthcare providers and payers significant savings over the next three years. However, only 49 percent of top leadership in healthcare organizations say that they understand what the Internet of Things could mean to their organization, according to the study. Considering that the value of the Internet of Things in healthcare, specifically, could top $163 billion by 2020, it’s important for healthcare organizations to get up to speed quickly on Internet of Things technology for healthcare organizations.

Read the report here.

To learn more about how healthcare organizations can integrate the Internet of Things, check out the new IEEE Guide to the Internet of Things online learning program, which has three modules specifically dedicated to the Internet of Things in healthcare. It’s a convenient way to learn about this emerging technology, and begin to create the strategy to integrate this technology into your organization.

Learn more about our organizational discount pricing here. You can also purchase the training as an individual through IEEE Xplore.

Continue Reading 0